FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules For 'Open Internet'. Ended by orange turd and losers.

  • Guest, I'm signing an executive order to make Courier the official sarcasm font on UnionVGF.

The Sunset Limited

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2017
2,387
266
960
Cuban is 100% wrong. Here's why:

His entire premise is that bandwidth is limited. Well, of course it is. Net neutrality has nothing to do with that and is not the way to fix it. It isn't even really a problem. The "problem" is that companies like Comcast have a terribly outdated cable TV model. Many people are streaming their entertainment from the internet. Well, Comcast gives you their internet too, so essentially they are selling one service that breaks their other one. So, suddenly they like the idea of being able to throttle traffic like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon. Instead of making their product more desirable or cheaper, they just want to charge us more for the same thing.

To put his argument into practical terms, let's say that a city has a real problem with car traffic. So, one solution would be to triple the price of gas. That's what anti-net neutrality people are saying.

Maybe the guy who runs a failing cable channel that nobody's ever heard of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AXS_TV isn't the best at this. If you want to know how Cuban got rich, he basically got really lucky with some acquisitions during the dotcom boom.
Ewww, you had me until the last part. I can't stand hearing people throw stones at successful people like that. Cuban is rich because he got lucky is a horrible mindset to have. No mas, no mas.

This is why this is such a difficult concept to comprehend.
 

Kerosene31

What happened to the American Dream? It came true.
Forum Mod
Supporting Member
Sep 12, 2013
7,168
1,502
3,620
Ewww, you had me until the last part. I can't stand hearing people throw stones at successful people like that. Cuban is rich because he got lucky is a horrible mindset to have. No mas, no mas.
Cuban's still wrong, my opinion aside (and the opinion of a good friend of mine who has worked with him for many years).
 

Kerosene31

What happened to the American Dream? It came true.
Forum Mod
Supporting Member
Sep 12, 2013
7,168
1,502
3,620

hrudey

XBox One X: The X Stands for Excellence
Sep 11, 2013
4,494
1,220
2,130
His entire premise is that bandwidth is limited. Well, of course it is.
I mean, can't we find some renewable bandwidth, or at least drill for some more of that? #SarcasmFont
 

Bodhi

Well-Known Member
Sep 11, 2013
404
65
424
The worst part of all of this is that I can't use the internet anymore. The terrorists have won....
 

Viktor

Well-Known Member
Cornerstone Member
Sep 11, 2013
9,331
1,518
12,930
This is not the Internet but a 4th dimension construct created in a shared hive mind after the collapse of TXB.
 

Plainview

I am a sinner.
Sep 11, 2013
23,706
7,794
4,279
Yeah, buddy! I love the Cuomo family!

https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/24/16928494/new-york-governor-net-neutrality-cuomo-executive-order

New York governor signs executive order to keep net neutrality rules after the FCC’s repeal

In an announcement today, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he has signed an executive order that would require internet service providers with state contracts to abide by net neutrality rules, even though the FCC recently voted to repeal those rules.

On Monday, Montana’s governor signed essentially the same order; both require service providers with contracts to abide by the widely agreed upon tenets of net neutrality: no blocking, throttling, or otherwise favoring content. But the more populous New York could now become a key battleground over net neutrality.

According to the order, any service provider receiving or renewing a contract after March 1st in New York will be required to sign an agreement saying they will adhere to net neutrality principles. Major companies, including Verizon and AT&T, have signed contracts with the state.

That, however, doesn’t mean the executive order will stand. When it passed its repeal of net neutrality rules late last year, the FCC specifically included a provision blocking states from passing their own rules. New York, like other states that attempt similar plans, will likely face a legal challenge.

On the federal level, meanwhile, a lawsuit from 22 attorneys general, led by New York, was filed earlier this month. The suit sets the stage for another protracted fight over the FCC’s decision.​
 

Kerosene31

What happened to the American Dream? It came true.
Forum Mod
Supporting Member
Sep 12, 2013
7,168
1,502
3,620
I think there's a very good chance Cuomo runs in 2020.
 

Plainview

I am a sinner.
Sep 11, 2013
23,706
7,794
4,279
I think there's a very good chance Cuomo runs in 2020.
Which one? I'm sure you mean Andrew.

Chris is a great speaker and can talk to anybody. He's a great for the people person, respectable, and calls it out from all sides. I don't think he would ever want to get into politics beyond commentating.
 

Kerosene31

What happened to the American Dream? It came true.
Forum Mod
Supporting Member
Sep 12, 2013
7,168
1,502
3,620
Which one? I'm sure you mean Andrew.

Chris is a great speaker and can talk to anybody. He's a great for the people person, respectable, and calls it out from all sides. I don't think he would ever want to get into politics beyond commentating.
Yes, definitely Andrew.

Just saw this lol

 

Viktor

Well-Known Member
Cornerstone Member
Sep 11, 2013
9,331
1,518
12,930
Which one? I'm sure you mean Andrew.

Chris is a great speaker and can talk to anybody. He's a great for the people person, respectable, and calls it out from all sides. I don't think he would ever want to get into politics beyond commentating.
lol I never even put it together that they were related.
 

Plainview

I am a sinner.
Sep 11, 2013
23,706
7,794
4,279
:txbrolleyes:

http://money.cnn.com/2018/01/24/technology/business/att-net-neutrality/index.html

AT&T wants Congress to pass a net neutrality law

In a full-page ad appearing in multiple U.S. newspapers on Wednesday, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said his company has suffered from regulatory whiplash. Various presidential administrations and government agencies have pursued wildly differing internet policies over the past decade.

AT&T wants clarity.

"It is time for Congress to end the debate once and for all, by writing new laws that govern the internet and protect consumers," Stephenson wrote.

He wants Congress to establish an "Internet Bill of Rights" that guarantees net neutrality, an open internet, and privacy protection for customers. Stephenson said the law should apply equally to all internet companies.

U.S. broadband companies, including AT&T, Comcast, Verizon and Spectrum, have largely opposed the government's past attempts to implement net neutrality regulation. For example, AT&T sued the FCC in 2015 in an attempt to block its net neutrality order that gave the government far more oversight of the broadband industry.

Consumer advocates say internet service providers like AT&T want to favor some websites, apps and services over others.

It might seem surprising to see AT&T lobbying Congress to regulate the internet. Yet AT&T and Comcast (CMCSA) have long championed a legislative solution.

AT&T (T) benefits if everybody plays by the same rules. That has become a bigger threat after the Republican-controlled FCC voted last year to undo its 2015 net neutrality order. In response, several states have laid the groundwork to pass their own net neutrality laws.

For any big company, the only things worse than federal regulation are dozens of different state regulations.

"Because the internet is so critical to everyone, it's understandably confusing and a bit concerning when you hear the rules have recently changed, yet again," Stephenson wrote. "Legislation would ... provide consistent rules of the road."

Lawmakers in both parties have expressed support for net neutrality legislation, though its prospects remain unclear. It's possible but uncertain that the country's largest telecommunications company lobbying for a bill could usher it through a Republican-controlled Congress and White House.

AT&T may also have trouble getting consumer advocates on board. Stephenson didn't provide any specifics, including whether the bill of rights would block controversial "fast lanes" for services and sites that pay broadband companies for preferential treatment.

Yet Stephenson said AT&T intends to work with Congress, consumer advocacy groups and its internet competitors in a push for a permanent legislative solution.

Meanwhile, AT&T says it is committed to net neutrality.

"We don't block websites. We don't censor online content. And we don't throttle, discriminate, or degrade network performance based on content. Period," Stephenson wrote.

AT&T proposed buying CNN parent company Time Warner in 2016, but the Justice Department has sued to block the deal. The trial is set to begin in March.
 

Viktor

Well-Known Member
Cornerstone Member
Sep 11, 2013
9,331
1,518
12,930
lol

Edit: Ninja post delete Sunset *shakes fist*
 
Last edited:

The Sunset Limited

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2017
2,387
266
960
If ya don’t wanna click past the jump...

This was a funny video but I did think it kind of supported the anti Net Neutrality contingent more.

Burger King wants to make money. In this scenario, they're clearly making choices to hurt their money making potential, which they would never do in real life. Capitalism wins!
 

Kerosene31

What happened to the American Dream? It came true.
Forum Mod
Supporting Member
Sep 12, 2013
7,168
1,502
3,620
This was a funny video but I did think it kind of supported the anti Net Neutrality contingent more.

Burger King wants to make money. In this scenario, they're clearly making choices to hurt their money making potential, which they would never do in real life. Capitalism wins!
It is actually a good point and shows the problem. If BK did this, we'd all just go to Wendy's or McDs or any other place. Problem solved.

For many people however, we only have maybe 1 or 2 choices for internet provider. I have 1 and only 1 internet provider in my area and if I don't like them my only recourse is shutting down high speed internet (which obviously isn't even a realistic option). If my ISP doubled my rates right now I would have no options other than to pay or to move somewhere else.

If we had lots of competition, we don't need regulations. Nobody wants to regulate hamburgers because competition works fine.

Regulations are needed in industries where a few companies have all the power.
 

The Sunset Limited

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2017
2,387
266
960
It is actually a good point and shows the problem. If BK did this, we'd all just go to Wendy's or McDs or any other place. Problem solved.

For many people however, we only have maybe 1 or 2 choices for internet provider. I have 1 and only 1 internet provider in my area and if I don't like them my only recourse is shutting down high speed internet (which obviously isn't even a realistic option). If my ISP doubled my rates right now I would have no options other than to pay or to move somewhere else.

If we had lots of competition, we don't need regulations. Nobody wants to regulate hamburgers because competition works fine.

Regulations are needed in industries where a few companies have all the power.
I googled "List of Monopolies in America today" and clicked on every link in the first two pages. Not one source had an internet service provider listed as a monopoly.

I then googled "Number of internet service providers in America" and clicked on a few of those links. The number seems to be in the thousands, most of which are obviously small and regional.

I don't think it's in the best interest of these big internet providers to start charging us $25.00 for a Whopper. Still not sold one way or the other.
 

Plainview

I am a sinner.
Sep 11, 2013
23,706
7,794
4,279
I googled "List of Monopolies in America today" and clicked on every link in the first two pages. Not one source had an internet service provider listed as a monopoly.

I then googled "Number of internet service providers in America" and clicked on a few of those links. The number seems to be in the thousands, most of which are obviously small and regional.

I don't think it's in the best interest of these big internet providers to start charging us $25.00 for a Whopper. Still not sold one way or the other.
There are countless counties across the United States that have only one provider, unless you want unusable DSL. I suggest you do more research.
 

Kerosene31

What happened to the American Dream? It came true.
Forum Mod
Supporting Member
Sep 12, 2013
7,168
1,502
3,620
I googled "List of Monopolies in America today" and clicked on every link in the first two pages. Not one source had an internet service provider listed as a monopoly.

I then googled "Number of internet service providers in America" and clicked on a few of those links. The number seems to be in the thousands, most of which are obviously small and regional.

I don't think it's in the best interest of these big internet providers to start charging us $25.00 for a Whopper. Still not sold one way or the other.
I can't even get DSL in my area. I'm in the suburbs outside a decent sized city and I have one option for internet service. My only other option would be to tether my phone over 3g. It isn't like I'm in the sticks, I'm right by the airport and one of the larger malls in the area.

Many years ago I was playing some online game and I kept getting disconnects. I tracked it down and it was definitely my provider. I called them and complained and complained, but what else could I do? I found some single player games to play. 6 months later there's trucks from the company around and suddenly no more disconnects. What else was I going to do? Call the BBB? The local news? Congress?

Even if I moved, I'd only maybe get one other option like Verizon. Thank goodness my service now has been very good, but what am I going to do if they throttle my Netflix?

Even now, they want to charge me $10/month to "lease" a cable modem that you can get off Amazon for $70. So I buy one of course, and then spend 2+ hours on the phone trying to get it activated. I kept getting the runaround because of course nobody understood wtf I was talking about. They kept acting like I was making this bizarre request (I bought the exact same model modem off Amazon).

I would say that's a monopoly.
 

The Sunset Limited

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2017
2,387
266
960
I think everyone (including myself) needs to take a deeper, more honest look.
 

The Sunset Limited

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2017
2,387
266
960
I have been, for years. I’m well versed on the subject.
When you hear people say what you just said (that you're well versed on this issue) about any number of different issues, what's your response?

We're surrounded by people who say they're experts on topics and we're told by them to disregard the opposing viewpoint. Take 10 seconds to watch the "experts " that come on Fox News and CNN.

I have no doubt you and others have taken a more in depth look at this, but just saying so isn't convincing to me. On either side of the topic mind you.

Plainview, let me ask you this. You say you've been studying this for years. Has a significant portion of that time been spent listening to and understanding the anti net neutrality side? Not only that, but have you recognized your own bias (we all have them) and thought about how that influences your stance? I've looked through the whole thread and it doesn't seem like anyone has (yet?).
 

Plainview

I am a sinner.
Sep 11, 2013
23,706
7,794
4,279
When you hear people say what you just said (that you're well versed on this issue) about any number of different issues, what's your response?

We're surrounded by people who say they're experts on topics and we're told by them to disregard the opposing viewpoint.

I have no doubt you and others have taken a more in depth look at this, but just saying so isn't convincing to me. On either side of the topic mind you.

Plainview, let me ask you this. You say you've been studying this for years. Has a significant portion of that time been spent listening to and understanding the anti net neutrality side? Not only that, but have you recognized your own bias (we all have them) and thought about how that influences your stance? I've looked through the whole thread and it doesn't seem like anyone has (yet?).
When someone says they’re well versed, I’d take that to mean they’ve been doing research for some time. The information is right out there. ISPs were doing anticonsumer tactics before Net Neutrality was instilled. I’ve said this before. They were throttling users. They were blocking apps. They were prohibiting content. They were reading people’s emails and deleting without knowledge. Do the research.

Nothing ISPs are saying is true. They’re not stifled by regulations. Their networks were built with our money. Our tax dollars build their digital infrastructure. We’re supposed to own it, not ISPs. Now, they’re trying to milk us. They’re trying to use our network to controls what we can view, when we can view it, how fast we can view it.

Do the research.
 

The Sunset Limited

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2017
2,387
266
960
When someone says they’re well versed, I’d take that to mean they’ve been doing research for some time. The information is right out there. ISPs were doing anticonsumer tactics before Net Neutrality was instilled. I’ve said this before. They were throttling users. They were blocking apps. They were prohibiting content. They were reading people’s emails and deleting without knowledge. Do the research.

Nothing ISPs are saying is true. They’re not stifled by regulations. Their networks were built with our money. Our tax dollars build their digital infrastructure. We’re supposed to own it, not ISPs. Now, they’re trying to milk us. They’re trying to use our network to controls what we can view, when we can view it, how fast we can view it.

Do the research.
I will do just that. You make sure to challenge your beliefs every now and then too.