Police murders, protests and racism

karmakid

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Viktor

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Figured this would show up. Was hoping to copy pasta a response I made to another site but alas it is currently down... so here it is again:

My first thought watching this video, aside from being appalled and disgusted, is confusion. I have a degree in law enforcement and have been through the academy. Now this is the general academy required by WI so beyond that training there might be more scenarios when it comes to something more similar to this. In my experience, the closest I have to compare this situation to is a high risk traffic stop, which at no point has the suspect crawling on his hands and knees towards you.

In a high risk traffic stop, which I would consider more dangerous to this since you have no idea what is inside the vehicle, after you have the suspect out of the car you have them face away from you with their hands in the air. Then instruct them to walk backwards to the sound of your voice, always keeping their hands in the air and facing away. If they start to deviate away, you have them stop and take side steps. Once they get back to you, have them get on their knees, lock their legs, etc.

Even ignoring the random, conflicting commands from these officers, the instant threat of being killed for doing anything odd, the way they go about apprehending the suspects is just mind boggling. I've seen others comment on why not just going up to them while they are on the ground after coming out of the room. The main reason I can think of is they have no idea who else is in that room. In this case it would be just like that high risk traffic stop.

Anyways aside from all of that I am not a police officer, which I'm now grateful for considering everything that has happened. Then again, the reason I didn't continue pursuing a police career is kind of ironic now considering how trigger happy they can seem. Based on one scenario where the suspect had a knife, I had a sofa in between us, and never personally felt threatened, I never shot them during the scenario and my partner ended up doing so. Because of that they didn't think I would be able to shoot someone, even though I had done so in other scenarios. Anyways, like I said it's ironic at this point.

tldr; based on my limited experience in police academy the way they attempted to apprehend this guy makes absolutely no sense to me
 

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Figured this would show up. Was hoping to copy pasta a response I made to another site but alas it is currently down... so here it is again:

My first thought watching this video, aside from being appalled and disgusted, is confusion. I have a degree in law enforcement and have been through the academy. Now this is the general academy required by WI so beyond that training there might be more scenarios when it comes to something more similar to this. In my experience, the closest I have to compare this situation to is a high risk traffic stop, which at no point has the suspect crawling on his hands and knees towards you.

In a high risk traffic stop, which I would consider more dangerous to this since you have no idea what is inside the vehicle, after you have the suspect out of the car you have them face away from you with their hands in the air. Then instruct them to walk backwards to the sound of your voice, always keeping their hands in the air and facing away. If they start to deviate away, you have them stop and take side steps. Once they get back to you, have them get on their knees, lock their legs, etc.

Even ignoring the random, conflicting commands from these officers, the instant threat of being killed for doing anything odd, the way they go about apprehending the suspects is just mind boggling. I've seen others comment on why not just going up to them while they are on the ground after coming out of the room. The main reason I can think of is they have no idea who else is in that room. In this case it would be just like that high risk traffic stop.

Anyways aside from all of that I am not a police officer, which I'm now grateful for considering everything that has happened. Then again, the reason I didn't continue pursuing a police career is kind of ironic now considering how trigger happy they can seem. Based on one scenario where the suspect had a knife, I had a sofa in between us, and never personally felt threatened, I never shot them during the scenario and my partner ended up doing so. Because of that they didn't think I would be able to shoot someone, even though I had done so in other scenarios. Anyways, like I said it's ironic at this point.

tldr; based on my limited experience in police academy the way they attempted to apprehend this guy makes absolutely no sense to me
Well, I've seen the first 4 Police Academy movies, so I feel fit/over qualified to comment too.

Situation is f***ed up. That just looks like murder to me. I really wish I didn't see it.
 

karmakid

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https://compete.kotaku.com/police-kill-28-year-old-after-prank-swatting-call-1821648110


A 28-year-old man was shot and killed by a Wichita police officer after a reported hostage situation... appears to have been linked to an argument over Call of Duty.

When police arrived on the scene, a man answered the door and was shot and killed by an officer.

The male was given verbal instructions and complied, said Livingston during the press conference. But according to the department’s statement, he reached towards his waistband, leading an officer to fire. The man was later confirmed to have been unarmed.

The officer in question has been placed on paid administrative leave, the police said, per departmental policy.

It appears that those responsible might have been two Call of Duty players who were competing in a $1.50 money match last night, based on Twitter screencaps shared among the Call of Duty community.
 

Viktor

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Another innocent person murdered by police. We have militarized police departments with less training than the military. It really says something when the military has stricter rules of engagement against enemy combatants than police do against random civilians. All they have to do is say they felt threatened and open fire at anyone.
 

Spiritech

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Wife had someone make call, told husband he should get gun hoping he'd get popped by police and she could collect insurance and file fat lawsuit.
Gets rid of unwanted husband and PROFIT.
Sadly that makes sense.
 

karmakid

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Follow up to the swatting...


https://kotaku.com/man-arrested-for-swatting-call-that-led-to-murder-charg-1822036529


Twenty-five-year-old Tyler Barriss was charged today in Kansas for involuntary manslaughter and two other counts in the wake of a swatting call that led police to kill an unarmed 28-year-old at his home. The maximum sentence varies but if found guilty, Barriss could face a hefty fine and years in prison.


Police say that Barriss had called police to report a hostage situation, telling officers on December 28, 2017 that he had his family at gunpoint and had doused the house with gasoline. He then gave them an address for 28-year-old Andrew Finch, who was shot and killed by an officer when he answered the door. That officer is now on paid administrative leave.
 

JinCA

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Be pissed at the degenerates that pulled the prank as well.
I'm pissed with both the guy who set the thing in motion and the cop who shot a man that answered the door.
 

Spiritech

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Follow up to the swatting...


https://kotaku.com/man-arrested-for-swatting-call-that-led-to-murder-charg-1822036529


Twenty-five-year-old Tyler Barriss was charged today in Kansas for involuntary manslaughter and two other counts in the wake of a swatting call that led police to kill an unarmed 28-year-old at his home. The maximum sentence varies but if found guilty, Barriss could face a hefty fine and years in prison.


Police say that Barriss had called police to report a hostage situation, telling officers on December 28, 2017 that he had his family at gunpoint and had doused the house with gasoline. He then gave them an address for 28-year-old Andrew Finch, who was shot and killed by an officer when he answered the door. That officer is now on paid administrative leave.
Man i know they have to go for a charge that they know that they can get a conviction on, but man. Its a premeditated act that ended in a death it feels like a light charge for it. Hope he gets the max at least.
 

hrudey

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Man i know they have to go for a charge that they know that they can get a conviction on, but man. Its a premeditated act that ended in a death it feels like a light charge for it. Hope he gets the max at least.
There definitey should be a specific crime defined for this going forward -- I know that there are laws that elevate killings that occur while committing a crime (not a lawyer, don't know the details), but I think if you're using a gun to commit a crime and a death occurs regardless of whether you use the gun, it can be murder). Maybe just expand the definition of one of the lower degrees of murder to include deaths caused by fraudulent activities (SWATting, selling products you know to hazardous, etc).
 
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Viktor

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Protect and serve.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/feb/06/tennessee-sheriff-caught-on-tape-killing-suspect-lawsuit

A Tennessee sheriff is being sued for using excessive force after he was recorded boasting he had told officers to shoot a man rather than risk damaging police cars by ramming him off the road.

“They said ‘we’re ramming him,’” Sheriff Oddie Shoupe of White County said on tape in the aftermath of the killing of suspect Michael Dial. “I said, ‘Don’t ram him, shoot him.’ f*** that s***. Ain’t gonna tear up my cars.”

Shoupe arrived on the scene shortly after police had shot Dial at the conclusion of a low-speed chase, clearly upset he had missed the excitement.

“I love this s***,” Shoupe said, apparently unaware that his comments were being picked up by another deputy’s body-worn camera. “God, I tell you what, I thrive on it.

“If they don’t think I’ll give the damn order to kill that motherf***er they’re full of s***,” he added, laughing. “Take him out. I’m here on the damn wrong end of the county,” he said.
 

The Sunset Limited

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Sounds like two really dumb people bumped into each other in the universe. One paid with his life. The other needs to pay too.
 

Viktor

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Not a shooting but perhaps this can be a thread for police corruption:

Experts question mother's arrest in crash that killed baby; off-duty cop going 94 mph remains on paid leave

A Baton Rouge lawmaker and legal experts weighed in Wednesday expressing "serious concern" about the recent arrest of a mother accused of failing to secure her baby daughter's car seat before an off-duty police officer crashed into their vehicle at 94 mph and fatally injured the child.
http://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/crime_police/article_7c7f4602-1cb0-11e8-a723-0bc2db424e30.html?mode=comments&sr_source=lift_amplify
 

Viktor

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https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/09/us/asheville-police-taser-jaywalking/index.html

North Carolina police officer resigns after beating, choking and tasing suspected jaywalker


(CNN)A western North Carolina police officer who resigned after a body camera video shows him hitting and using a Taser on a man suspected of jaywalking will face preliminary charges of assault, the Buncombe County District Attorney's Office said Thursday.

Senior Police Officer Christopher Hickman, 31, was removed from patrol duty a day after the incident last August and resigned from the Asheville Police Department in January, the same day he was to be terminated, according to a timeline of the case released by the Asheville City Council.
On Thursday, a judge issued a warrant for Hickman's arrest on one count each of assault by strangulation, assault inflicting serious injury and communicating threats.
 

Viktor

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f*** this piece of s***

http://abcnews.go.com/US/police-officers-suit-woman-son-killed-collision-offensive/story?id=53607504

Police officer's suit against woman whose son was killed in collision 'offensive': Lawyer

A New Mexico police officer with a history of being reprimanded for on-duty crashes filed a lawsuit against a woman whose 6-year-old son was killed when the officer slammed into their vehicle while speeding to a crime in progress. Jonathan McDonnell of the Albuquerque Police Department filed the civil suit against Antoinette Suina, charging she "failed to yield to an emergency vehicle" when she turned in front of his speeding patrol car in 2017.

McDonnell's suit counters one Suina filed in January against him and the city of Albuquerque, charging the officer's "deliberate, intentional, and/or reckless" conduct led to the crash that killed her boy and left her and her 9-year-old daughter, Adriana, severely injured.

A Bernalillo County sheriff's deputy who investigated the crash wrote in a report, obtained by ABC News, that McDonnell was going 67 miles per hour when he hit Suina's SUV. The deputy noted that "the design of the roadway and intersection makes it hard to see oncoming vehicles in both directions when there are vehicles in the turn bays to proceed east and west."

During my time in the academy we learned about proper, safe approach to intersections and this was not it. We were trained to slow down to make sure the intersection was clear before preceding.
 

Viktor

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Unarmed black man holding cellphone shot by Sacramento police: report

The Sacramento County Sheriff Department said that a black man shot and killed Sunday by law enforcement had been holding a cellphone rather than a “tool bar,” according to The Sacramento Bee.

Stephon Clark, a 22-year-old man living with his siblings and grandparents, was shot in his backyard Sunday evening, the newspaper reported.



“The only thing that I heard was pow, pow, pow, pow, and I got to the ground," Clark’s grandmother told the Bee.

Law enforcement said they thought Clark had a gun when he "extended in front of him" an “object” as he moved toward two officers.
http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/379485-police-shoot-unarmed-black-man-holding-cell-phone-that-they-thought-was-a?rnd=1521640597
 

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Viktor

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Are you f***ing kidding me?

https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/27/us/milwaukee-man-dies-after-tasering/index.html

Officers not charged in death of mentally ill man they tased in shower

(CNN)An investigation into the death of a mentally ill man who was repeatedly tased in his shower by two West Milwaukee police officers has concluded with no charges being filed, Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm said.
The medical examiner said the cause of Adam Trammell's death on May 25, 2017, was "excited delirium" and the manner of death was undetermined, according to the district attorney's report obtained by the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel newspaper.
"I do not believe there is a sufficient factual or legal basis to believe that either officer's actions were a direct or indirect factor in his death," Chisholm said.

Officers Michael Rohleder and Anthony Munoz went to Trammell's apartment after somebody called 911 to report a naked man in the hallway, the district attorney's report said. The caller said they feared he was having a "psychotic break," the report said.
Body camera video obtained by the Journal-Sentinel showed the officers knocking on the door and breaking it down with a battering ram when nobody answered. The video showed officers walking into the bathroom and speaking to a wet, naked Trammell standing in the shower. They mistakenly call him "Brandon."

Trammell, who was drinking a liquid from a clear plastic jug, stared silently at Officer Munoz when Munoz spoke to him, and used his open hand to push Munoz's forearm when the officer touched him, the report said. At that point, the report said, Munoz realized that the liquid Trammell was drinking was hot water. In the body camera video, an officer says, "You're going to get tased," then a snapping sound is heard and Trammell screams and falls onto his back in the tub.

The report quoted Munoz and Rohleder saying they used the Tasers because they thought they were dealing with a medical emergency that would require a patient to be calm to receive treatment.
Yea f*** cops I no longer care.
 
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Spiritech

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OMG how threatened can you be from a ground hog.