Project Scarlet (next Xbox)

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Rollins

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Can someone explain blockchain to me simply, please?

https://www.finder.com.au/xbox-streaming-games

New Xbox Scarlett Cloud console likely to use Blockchain
Will the next Xbox use a blockchain?

The rumoured streaming-only, “Netflix for games” console Microsoft is working on to use just announced Xbox blockchain technology.
Surely you’ve seen the rumour. The one about Xbox Scarlett Cloud. It’s unconfirmed, but take it as gospel: Microsoft will release a version of its Xbox Next console that is a streaming only device. That device is currently working under the title Scarlett Cloud.
The industry giant has been pointing to a streaming only console for a number of months now and if you link together the various strands of conversation and official comments, the intent is clear. Not only that, recent developments also point to a streaming console that utilises the blockchain. That’s the same revolutionary technology used to power cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Ripple and Ethereum, but it also has multiple other applications.
But first, an overview of the Xbox Scarlett Cloud.
Everything you need to know about Xbox Scarlett Cloud
Scarlett Cloud isn’t a piece of hardware, but instead the name of a platform. It exists much as any other cloud service we’ve come to know and accept in our daily lives, from Google Drive to Netflix, but leverages Microsoft’s existing Azure Cloud infrastructure. The Azure Cloud is a network of data centres that Microsoft has been assembling over the course of this decade all over the globe.
Azure would now have near complete penetration into the world’s major metropolitan centres, ensuring that platforms that leverage these data centres – like Scarlett Cloud – can operate in low latency environments. This is obviously critical to any form of game streaming, where latency is highly detrimental to play across the majority of popular genres. In particular, the first-person shooter.
According to the rumours, the Xbox Scarlett Cloud streaming box won’t be bereft of hardware. In order to further circumnavigate the issue of latency, enough processing power will remain on board the box to handle a low-level version of the game. In this way, elements like hit detection, image processing and user inputs will occur as they normally do. However, the hard yakka will be taken care of by the superior power hosted on the Scarlett Cloud platform.
This should ensure a smaller, more elegant console that is significantly cheaper than the price points we’ve come to expect in recent generations. With fewer moving parts, it should be less susceptible to breaking down, too. And perhaps most importantly, it should allow Microsoft to not sell the Xbox Scarlett Cloud device at a loss – a fact for previous generations – leaving more money available to invest in content.
Browse Game Pass

We only have to look back as far as the Microsoft E3 press conference in June 2018 to see Microsoft revealing its intent, adding strength to the rumour of the Xbox Scarlett Cloud. Notably:
  1. Phil Spencer, the head of Xbox, spoke during his keynote address of the company’s attention being drawn to streaming. He stated: “Our focus is on bringing console quality games that you see on TV or PC to any device."
  2. Prior to E3, at the DICE Summit, Spencer spoke openly about Microsoft’s acceptance of change. He said; “It was obvious Microsoft needed a reboot. Morale had hit a low, we were all massively frustrated we kept missing big trends. In some ways, it felt like real innovation was impossible.”
  3. In an interview with Business Insider in late January, Spencer said: “I’m bullish on Game Pass’ long-term potential to allow people to play the games they want on the devices they want. And I think that, as we continue to build the audience for Game Pass, our discussions with third parties will continue to grow.”
  4. Back to E3, and Spencer acknowledged publically for the first time that there is a new Xbox console on the way. He declared: “In this significant moment, we are constantly challenging ourselves: where can we take gaming next? The same team that delivered unprecedented performance with Xbox One X is deep into architecting the next Xbox consoles, where we will once again deliver on our commitment to set the benchmark for console gaming.”
  5. This past week just ahead of the Xbox Scarlett Cloud leak, Ubisoft co-founder and CEO Yves Guillemot has backed the idea of a streaming console, telling Variety: “I think we will see another generation, but there is a good chance that step-by-step we will see less and less hardware. With time, I think streaming will become more accessible to many players and make it not necessary to have big hardware at home. There will be one more console generation and then after that, we will be streaming, all of us.”
  6. EA also pointed to this future during its E3 conference. The company showed footage of console quality FIFA action streaming from the cloud and being played on a mobile device. EA’s chief technology officer Ken Moss said: “I truly believe it is going to revolutionize how games are experienced. We have watched it, studied it, have been working on it for a while now and we really believe that strong future is right about now.”
So why would Xbox Scarlett use the blockchain?
In the wake of the E3 press conference, Microsoft made a rather huge announcementthat very few gamers seemed to notice. The company announced that it had moved all of its royalty payments for the Xbox ecosystem to the blockchain.
This replaced the previous manual, excel-driven method that was used beforehand – a method that took 45-days to process. By moving the tracking of all transactions within the Xbox ecosystem to the blockchain, not only could third-parties selling games through the Live Marketplace get real-time data on their product’s sales, but receive that revenue quickly and cheaply.
Tim Stuart, chief financial officer of Xbox, said in the report: “We are developing an ecosystem within the gaming industry that connects developers and publishers to game performance. Providing near real-time access to data greatly improves the process’ effectiveness and insights that lead to a more enriching experience for the partners.”
That was not all. Microsoft also revealed at the same time it had partnered with the mighty Ubisoft to use its Azure Cloud blockchain technology for the French company’s own in-house royalties distribution. So not only is Microsoft already using the blockchain to handle its in-house finances for Xbox, but it’s being leveraged by third-parties to handle their royalty distribution.
(For example, think of how every dollar that comes in to Ubisoft from Microsoft for Just Dance needs to be sliced up and send out by Ubisoft to all the music labels, sub-contractors and so forth.)
It’s clear that Microsoft has embraced the power of blockchain, and cryptocurrency, as a means of handling its financial back end. Smart contracts are a smart choice. It’s a good thing for gamers, too, as a closed, non-speculative environment for a cryptocurrency means a faster, cheaper and more secure transaction space. Which is exactly what you want and need if you are going to take your entire product into the world of cloud streaming as is planned with Xbox Scarlett Cloud. A world where traditional FIAT currency is redundant.
A further indication that Microsoft is shifting future consoles to a blockchain driven in-ecosystem currency was offered by general manager of finance operations at Microsoft, Grace Lao. She said: “Smart contract technology is far more flexible and scalable than any prior solution for managing business agreements. We look forward to deploying his solution across our gaming ecosystem and exploring additional blockchain applications for other finance processes at Microsoft.”
We dedicated an episode of our Video Games and the Blockchain TV show to it, which is worth a look for those who want to learn more.

When will Xbox Scarlett Cloud come out?
As this is only a rumour, we're still speculating on its existence, let alone its release date. However, it's fair to assume that the upcoming Xbox console - whatever it is - will not let the PlayStation 5 get a jump on it. We've seen a lot of evidence to suggest that the PlayStation 5 is earmarked for a November 2020 release date. With that in mind, you can pencil in a November 2020 release date for the Xbox Scarlett Cloud console, too. Just keep your eraser handy!
Xbox Scarlett Cloud is a compelling argument
When you join the dots between the Blockchain announcement and the streaming gaming service rumour in Scarlett Cloud, you have an extremely compelling distribution system for developers.
Developers will get data on sales in real time, get royalties paid near fee-free and on the run, and can have their titles play on any device with a screen (an unbeatable big install base). Meanwhile, consumers could have access to - and true ownership of - all of their games (and in-game characters and items) on demand no matter what device they are on.
Assuming Microsoft doesn’t over-reach with its subscription price or take too big a slice of the pie from studios, the Xbox Next would quickly become the first port of call for any content creator.
So that’s not just game developers, but filmmakers, music artists, streamers, eSports tournaments – anyone really. This topples the single biggest issue that’s held the Xbox One back: lack of consistent, varied, exclusive content – at least, relative to its competitors.
Xbox Scarlett Cloud and the blockchain could very well be a match made in heaven.
 

pravus

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Do you think they named this project Scarlett after her nudes leaked?

I'd like to think so.
 

Hedon

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Do you think they named this project Scarlett after her nudes leaked?

I'd like to think so.
Well then....I wouldn't mind a Project Scarlett Edition Xbox....if you get my drift.....
 

TDbank24

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Do you think they named this project Scarlett after her nudes leaked?

I'd like to think so.
Wish they had called it Project Kardashian. Like Kim, Xbox is everywhere these days.

Errybody already seen dem nudes.
 

Rollins

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Do you think they named this project Scarlett after her nudes leaked?

I'd like to think so.
Noooooooooo. If anything, those pics didn’t raise her stock for me. If she weren’t famous I honestly think she wouldn’t be considered very attractive.

They should have named it Project J Lawrence. Her stock went waaaay up with those leaked nudes. Oh yes. Along with my sundial.
 

pravus

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Noooooooooo. If anything, those pics didn’t raise her stock for me. If she weren’t famous I honestly think she wouldn’t be considered very attractive.

They should have named it Project J Lawrence. Her stock went waaaay up with those leaked nudes. Oh yes. Along with my sundial.
I think Lawrence also had a somewhat newer video as well where's she's derping it up a bit, still a win.
 

Rollins

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Pretty good editorial/summary:

https://dispatches.cheatcc.com/3788

Are the Xbox Rumors Our Next Step? - Cheat Code Central

It’s no secret that console makers are trying to push the platform into a new evolutionary stage. From Nintendo blurring the lines between on TV and handheld play, to Microsoft and Sony creating modular half-steps this generation, it’s obvious the traditional state of things has been disrupted. Meanwhile, several companies are working on making game streaming, something that has struggled to take, more of a viable option. If rumors about Microsoft’s plans for the next generation Xbox are even remotely true, we could be seeing a combination of modular consoles and streaming, and that might just be the right decision to make.

Let’s start with a brief summary of the rumor. Boiling it down to the basics, the rumor is that Microsoft will be dropping two different Xbox consoles. One will be the usual box with all the guts and power inside, with the hardcore consumer in mind. This will be the big boy, the 4K box, the one that will set people back a few hundred bucks. You don’t really need a rumor to know this is happening. The other half of the equation is a streaming box. This is a console unit that will have very little on the inside in terms of horsepower, that will be entirely based on a streaming platform still under development. This will effectively, again according to the rumor, cut the cost of the box down to under $200.

If this works, and Sony doesn’t do something similar, Microsoft could easily sneak right by and land into a pile of success. The fact is, while high-speed internet is still an ongoing process, game streaming is starting to work. People that do have high-speed internet can use services like the (still in beta) Nvidia GeForce NOW platform to play games with very little input latency, and super high visual settings. Similar rumors are swirling around Google, and EA has its own streaming platform as well. With companies of that size dumping resources in, it’s only natural that the technology will continue to close the gap that scares people away now.

If the next Xbox launches two options, with the streaming box being much cheaper, that opens the door for early adopters to jump in and try it out without too much to worry about. If the box is only in the neighborhood of $150, people who can already access and afford high-speed connections needed to sustain game streaming won’t have to think too hard about trying it out. If the cost to buy in is low, that must mean the cost of manufacture is low, and Microsoft likely won’t lose nearly as much (if any) on the streaming boxes as it will the traditional consoles. With the power of Microsoft branding behind it, this could be the move that pushes streaming out of the niche of third-party services, and right into the mainstream proving grounds.

If it works, and works in tandem with services like Xbox Game Pass, we could end up with a platform that not only puts Microsoft in a better position to curate and develop its own ecosystem, but also put consumers in a spot that saves a ton of overhead costs on console gaming. If you’re paying less than two hundred bucks to get in, then only another ten a month to gain access to first party games on day one and supplemental content from third parties, that’s going to be the most affordable console gaming has ever been, for those that have the internet access. From there, it will be all about pushing high-speed internet into more homes, and while things like the death of net neutrality are a concern, I can see a world in which Microsoft helps push that along somehow. It could also be a world in which the major competitors in the gaming space become Microsoft and Google, instead of Microsoft and Sony. That’s pushing it though, as Sony has plenty of brand power of its own, and even if it’s just pushing out the usual powerhouse box, as long as the economy stays where it is (or grows), there’s not going to be many issues with selling hardware.

What do you all think? Could the dual option platform be a real thing that’s coming from Xbox? Could Sony be planning something similar with the streaming tech it already has? Will Google come in and make things even more complicated? Does Nintendo care at all? There are a lot of questions to be answered as we head towards the next generations, which are only made more mysterious by the things that have already happened this generation. I’m certainly curious to see how it all plays out, and if streaming works, you can bet I’ll hop on the cheaper box.
 

Rollins

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Ps5 and Xbox Scarlett Will Likely Focus On Online Connectivity And Innovative Options, Says Dev

NASCAR Heat 3 developer talks about next gen consoles.



As the next generation of home consoles draws closer, speculation surrounding what sorts of improvements they’ll bring about continues to grow as well. And while the next Xbox and PlayStation are probably still at least a couple of years away, the talk surrounding them has been getting progressively more frequent.

Recently, we sat down with Monster Games’ Sean Wilson, who’s the executive producer on the upcoming NASCAR Heat 3, and, as we often do, we asked him about the next generation of consoles, and what his expectations are from the PS5 and the Xbox Scarlett (or whatever Microsoft will eventually end up calling it). Wilson’s answer was a pretty interesting one, though the thing he seems to expect from the next generation most of all seems to be a renewed focus on online connectivity, and what he calls “innovative options”.

“My assumption is we’ll just have more power to do bigger and better games,” Wilson said while speaking with GamingBolt. “With that in mind, we’re not only trying to make NASCAR Heatbetter on current platforms now, but we’re also preparing our game code and assets to transition to be ready for more power. Beyond that, I’m sure a primary focus of future consoles will be online connectivity. I’m hopeful we’ll get even more new and innovative options when it comes to competing with other gamers.”

That seems like a pretty safe bet. Better online connectivity is something that almost seems like a pre-requisite at this point, and if reports on Microsoft’s increased focus on options for cloud gaming for the next Xbox are anything to go by, it’s definitely going to be a reality, not just a theory. As far as having more power and “innovative options” go, that too seems like something we’ll all be expecting. For instance, the Assassin’s Creed Odyssey director also just wants to see “more of everything” in next-gen consoles.


https://gamingbolt.com/ps5-and-xbox-...tions-says-dev
 

Swede

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Have enough bandwidth to go all out streaming, most here have that option (government made promise that whole country would have fiber and making good on that right now). If games will be downgraded because of this (ie ps now), I'll rather hold off and go with stronger local hardware.
 

Rollins

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This is an editorial, but maybe GP is like a beta test for the streaming version of Scarlett..?

Xbox All Access Could Give Xbox Scarlett A Major Advantage Next Generation

Xbox All Access may be a clever, long term play by Microsoft.



Earlier this week, Microsoft finally announced the long rumored Xbox All Access at last. For those of you who are curious about what that is, it is basically a plan where instead of spending money on the system upfront, you pay for it over a period of two years, by committing to remain subscribed to Xbox Live and Xbox Game Pass for that period. Monthly payments vary from $20-$35, depending on what model of Xbox you choose to get, but on the whole, this isn’t much different than buying a smartphone over a two year contract (although Microsoft’s pricing is far fairer). It’s something Microsoft has attempted once before with Xbox 360 (and Sega with Dreamcast), but that was a very limited rollout that went nowhere.

This time, it feels a bit different, though, especially given the confluence of circumstances from the last few years. It lines up with Microsoft’s own focus on services and trying to get subscribers for them- for the company, their hardware has just become a way to try and get more people subscribed to their services. Microsoft would, in that case, be all too happy to take a short term loss on their hardware to make it up over the long term with assured subscribers.

Here’s the other interesting thing, though- after the original Xbox One was weaker than the competition, Microsoft seems to have woken up to the fact that power has always been perceived to be a core part of the Xbox brand’s DNA, and that that is an advantage over Sony they can’t afford to relinquish again. This was most evident in terms of the Xbox One X, where they were willing to go all out to making it the most powerful console ever made- and now, the same team that worked on the One X is working on the next generation Xbox, reportedly codenamed Scarlett.



"A powerful and loaded to the gills next generation Xbox would be very expensive- the Xbox One X alone is $500, and even accounting for price drops, it means that a proper next gen system will be at least that much, a price that is prohibitively high for the mass market. "

A powerful and loaded to the gills next generation Xbox would be very expensive- the Xbox One X alone is $500, and even accounting for price drops, it means that a proper next gen system will be at least that much, a price that is prohibitively high for the mass market.

We have already heard how Microsoft plans to sidestep this to a degree- rumors regarding the Xbox Scarlet mention multiple SKUs, including a cheaper one which will primarily be for streaming games only, eschewing most local hardware. However, even for people who don’t want a gutted Xbox for themselves like that, and want the full experience, something like Xbox All Access could help.

Essentially, Xbox All Access allows Microsoft to sell a very powerful system for a reasonable upfront price, without taking much of a financial hit. Consider a supremely powerful next generation Xbox, for example, which costs $600 because of how powerful and loaded it is. That would ordinarily be the kiss of death- but an All Access style plan allows Microsoft to sell it for $200 upfront, with the other $400 covered for over two years via guaranteed subscriptions to Xbox Live and Game Pass.

Over the long term, of course, the amount paid to Microsoft will come to $600 or more, depending on the payment plan- but upfront, Microsoft can advertise “the most powerful system made” for $200. Assuming the next generation PlayStation is more powerful than Scarlett, Microsoft can still contain the damage by advertising their system for $200. North America, especially, is a market that is already used to using credit to buy things, and to long term payment plans for purchases ranging from homes, cars, to yes, smartphones. This is something the market could easily come to terms with, at least there.



"North America, especially, is a market that is already used to using credit to buy things, and to long term payment plans for purchases ranging from homes, cars, to yes, smartphones. This is something the market could easily come to terms with, at least there."

And therein lies the advantage Microsoft has potentially created for itself with the rollout of Xbox All Access: by introducing this plan now, getting early feedback, gauging market reactions, and making course corrections accordingly, not to mention normalizing the idea of a console paid for in this way now, they could roll out a far more palatable and ambitious plan with Xbox Scarlet at launch- allowing them to have their cake and eat it too. Basically: have a powerful console that does not compromise on anything; sell it for a mass market friendly price; don’t take a financial loss on it. That’s literally the dream scenario for any console vendor, but it is one that only Microsoft is positioned to pull off, especially since neither Sony nor Nintendo share the same extent of focus on services that Microsoft does.

Of course, we could see Sony attempt something like this too- they have PS Plus, PS Vue, and PS Now. That’s enough services to try and push something like this. But where Sony has missed the beat is in not getting ahead of the game on that front now. If this is something they want to do, they need to start doing it now, and normalize it, iron out the kinks with a relatively low stakes rollout for their current generation machines. They could leave it for next generation- and it may not go all that well, and they wouldn’t have the time to respond to it, since they would be doing things on the fly, unlike Microsoft, who would have had the chance to address whatever feedback they receive on it ahead of time.

Which brings me to the thesis- Microsoft’s potential genius here is in positioning themselves to delivering something that is palatable and beneficial to all parties involved, including especially their customers, but also themselves. Having a dedicated pool of subscribers for Game Pass would also, for instance, allow them to negotiate better with third parties regarding getting their games on the service. This is in addition to potentially being able to sell a powerful console for cheap- it’s an all around win.

Of course, this is all a hypothetical- Xbox All Access could go nowhere, and put a stop to this fantasy upfront. But for now, I am very curious to see how things play out.

Note: The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, GamingBolt as an organization.


https://gamingbolt.com/xbox-all-acce...ext-generation
 

Mcmasters

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Jez also said after someone asked him if he thought Scarlet would be more powerful than the Ps5, and I quote, "I KNOW IT WILL."
 

Frozpot

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Jez also said after someone asked him if he thought Scarlet would be more powerful than the Ps5, and I quote, "I KNOW IT WILL."
Who is Jez, again, and how would he know enough about both companies' plans to make such a statement?
 

Andy

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Who is Jez, again, and how would he know enough about both companies' plans to make such a statement?
Jez makes some stupid statements sometimes.
 

JinCA

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He's probably just assuming that the PS5 will come out first which means that by default the next Xbox will be more powerful when it comes out later
 

Rollins

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He's probably just assuming that the PS5 will come out first which means that by default the next Xbox will be more powerful when it comes out later
Quite possibly.

Personally I think we’ll see both in 2020.

MS learned a harsh lesson this gen, and with the money they are throwing around on studios alone, I’m sure they won’t lose the ‘power war’ again. Ever. They’re all in.
 

Mcmasters

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Who is Jez, again, and how would he know enough about both companies' plans to make such a statement?
Jez works for Windows central. He tweets pretty often and he usually has some prerty solid info. I wouldn't label him an insider but, he's come through enough to be heard. Check him out on Twitter. You'll find his response that I quoted.
 

JinCA

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Quite possibly.

Personally I think we’ll see both in 2020.

MS learned a harsh lesson this gen, and with the money they are throwing around on studios alone, I’m sure they won’t lose the ‘power war’ again. Ever. They’re all in.
The power war is going to be pretty meaningless once we get into next gen, the machines will both be over 10TF (most likely) so it's hard to see where either company could push the tech in a realistic way beyond what the other does, they are going to have to put more and faster memory in the new machines and higher end CPU's so costs are already going to be higher plus they'll have heating and power consumption to worry about.

Just look at the One X, people always compare that to the Pro as if they launched at the same time but they didn't, the One X came out a year later and cost $100 more so you expect it to be more powerful but it also took a more expensive cooling solution and an extra 4GB of memory which pushed the cost to $500. I don't think either company is going to be willing to lose money ever again on console sales (they've basically said that) and they fact that tech isn't advancing as fast as it did 10 years ago means any meaningful power advantage you get by waiting a year is going to be pretty small. You may be able to claim to be the most powerful on paper but in real life it's going to be hard to see much difference.

The difference will be more about who's got the games to offer and the better overall experience. MS didn't lose this gen just because of the power difference, yeah people like us pay attention to that but they lost because they came out $100 more than the competition with a weaker console and tried to force a bunch of non gaming stuff on the early adopters who are all about games. They also totally failed to introduce successful new IP's and their biggest series have fallen a bit in popularity, they simply misread their audience. MS isn't likely to ever "win" a generation, they just don't have the global appeal that Sony or Nintendo do, that doesn't mean they can't make a ton of money and be very successful if they do things the right way but three generations in they still haven't made many gains in anyplace that's not called North America or the UK.

MS is buying smaller studios so the while then number of studios sounds like a lot it's not like they are throwing around money with reckless abandon either, it's strategic spending and I'm glad they are doing it but it's doubtful any of these new studios will have anything ready before 2021 unless they had something they were already deep into development on that is just going to be moved over to the next xbox.
 
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Rollins

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While I agree next gen will be at the point of diminishing returns, I disagree about power not being a major factor last gen. That was practically the entire narrative the first few years. I mean c’mon, Yoshida was quoted as saying ‘1080p allows you to be a better gamer’.

The message to the consumer was the X1 was underpowered, overpriced, and focused on TV. It got buried because of that the first few years. The ‘exclusives, exclusives’ came later, especially once the X debuted.

So while we might not see a big difference in game quality, I fully expected MS to do some serious dick-waving with numbers once they are released. DF videos matter to quite a few people, apparently, and they are helping to sell the X. For example, sites reported big jumps in inquires about it after the RDR2 comparisons came out, and sales increased.

So while it may not matter to the casual, and it might not be a huge difference in the end, the performance numbers do matter, and I’ll double down on MS’s focus on being most powerful.

I also agree about the studios, but I think we’ll see games before ‘21. The reports have all been saying MS has been giving these studios tons of support and resources. Several of them have hired a significant number of employees already, and in terms of production, that’s huge. I expect to see something significant from every one of them at E3, and probably new stuff teased well before that.

And I agree, they probably won’t ‘win’ the generation, but they don’t have to. They have a completely different strategy. As long as the brand keeps growing, it’s a win for everybody. I’m excited to see some new stuff!
 

JinCA

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While I agree next gen will be at the point of diminishing returns, I disagree about power not being a major factor last gen. That was practically the entire narrative the first few years. I mean c’mon, Yoshida was quoted as saying ‘1080p allows you to be a better gamer’.

The message to the consumer was the X1 was underpowered, overpriced, and focused on TV. It got buried because of that the first few years. The ‘exclusives, exclusives’ came later, especially once the X debuted.

So while we might not see a big difference in game quality, I fully expected MS to do some serious dick-waving with numbers once they are released. DF videos matter to quite a few people, apparently, and they are helping to sell the X. For example, sites reported big jumps in inquires about it after the RDR2 comparisons came out, and sales increased.

So while it may not matter to the casual, and it might not be a huge difference in the end, the performance numbers do matter, and I’ll double down on MS’s focus on being most powerful.

I also agree about the studios, but I think we’ll see games before ‘21. The reports have all been saying MS has been giving these studios tons of support and resources. Several of them have hired a significant number of employees already, and in terms of production, that’s huge. I expect to see something significant from every one of them at E3, and probably new stuff teased well before that.

And I agree, they probably won’t ‘win’ the generation, but they don’t have to. They have a completely different strategy. As long as the brand keeps growing, it’s a win for everybody. I’m excited to see some new stuff!
DF videos will likely be hard pressed to find meaningful difference next gen without microscopic comparisons which will come off as a bit desperate. The original X1 and PS4 launched at the same time so comparing them straight up was fair, people treat comparing the Pro and the One X like they are the same situation are misguided.

I don't get this belief that MS fans have (I used to believe it too) that they always have the most powerful hardware, that's only been true once and that was when the original Xbox launched which came out after the other consoles did. The 360 was not more powerful than the PS3 it was just better designed which ended up making more of a difference than the raw power advantage of the PS3, the X1 was weaker than the PS4 and while the One X is the most powerful now it was yet again another console that came out after it's main competitor.

I still think the next xbox comes out a year after the PS5 and because of that they will have slightly more powerful hardware. The only way MS has a significant power advantage in any way is if Sony s***s the bed and puts out something that's like 8TF with 12GB of memory because they are afraid to go over $399 at launch.

You better hope that those new studios don't have games to show already next year, several of them are small studios who were mediocre to begin with and the last thing you want is them rushing something out for their debut 1st party MS game. The studio that's supposedly working on Fable seems like the one that would release a game first and they just started hiring this year right? No way a AAA game gets made in less than 3 years for a next gen console unless it's something barebones.
 

Swede

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Pretty clear ms will have a streaming service miles ahead of sony next gen. If this will equal better sales, I have no idea.
 

Andy

white crow
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I don't know if the services themselves will be the key. Right now the services are pretty similar (apart from the game catalogs). I think what'll make the difference is that MS is planning to offer a low-cost subscription/digital-only model console, whereas (afaik) Sony is not. That could open up a sizeable market for Xbox among casual and/or income-strapped gamers, who normally don't join a generation at the beginning but might this time.
 

Frozpot

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Sep 13, 2013
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DF videos will likely be hard pressed to find meaningful difference next gen without microscopic comparisons which will come off as a bit desperate. The original X1 and PS4 launched at the same time so comparing them straight up was fair, people treat comparing the Pro and the One X like they are the same situation are misguided.

I don't get this belief that MS fans have (I used to believe it too) that they always have the most powerful hardware, that's only been true once and that was when the original Xbox launched which came out after the other consoles did. The 360 was not more powerful than the PS3 it was just better designed which ended up making more of a difference than the raw power advantage of the PS3, the X1 was weaker than the PS4 and while the One X is the most powerful now it was yet again another console that came out after it's main competitor.

I still think the next xbox comes out a year after the PS5 and because of that they will have slightly more powerful hardware. The only way MS has a significant power advantage in any way is if Sony s***s the bed and puts out something that's like 8TF with 12GB of memory because they are afraid to go over $399 at launch.

You better hope that those new studios don't have games to show already next year, several of them are small studios who were mediocre to begin with and the last thing you want is them rushing something out for their debut 1st party MS game. The studio that's supposedly working on Fable seems like the one that would release a game first and they just started hiring this year right? No way a AAA game gets made in less than 3 years for a next gen console unless it's something barebones.
Hiring doesn't mean that much at first. Pre production is a large, important part of developing anything, and that won't require much more than your core team. They'll likely get all the prototyping and conceptual work buttoned up before they even know how many people TO hire.
 

JinCA

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Sep 11, 2013
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Hiring doesn't mean that much at first. Pre production is a large, important part of developing anything, and that won't require much more than your core team. They'll likely get all the prototyping and conceptual work buttoned up before they even know how many people TO hire.
Yes and the time it takes to settle on what you are going to do and get the first roadmap (which always changes) of where you want to go up and running takes some time, especially if you are moving onto something totally new which I hope all of these studios do (well other than undead labs) because none of the studios they've picked up are really makers of must have games. Yes Ninja Theory had a really cool concept and executed well with their last game but that's not really something they can do again. It seems with each generation development cycles take longer and with these studios just coming on board with MS this year it would seem like anything being ready to show next year would be completely rushed and not make much sense. Plus if they are all really working on next gen stuff they won't be showing anything until that hardware is actually announced which will likely be 2020 since announcing new hardware less than 2 years after you released a $500 console may rub some people the wrong way.
 

Frozpot

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Yes and the time it takes to settle on what you are going to do and get the first roadmap (which always changes) of where you want to go up and running takes some time, especially if you are moving onto something totally new which I hope all of these studios do (well other than undead labs) because none of the studios they've picked up are really makers of must have games. Yes Ninja Theory had a really cool concept and executed well with their last game but that's not really something they can do again. It seems with each generation development cycles take longer and with these studios just coming on board with MS this year it would seem like anything being ready to show next year would be completely rushed and not make much sense. Plus if they are all really working on next gen stuff they won't be showing anything until that hardware is actually announced which will likely be 2020 since announcing new hardware less than 2 years after you released a $500 console may rub some people the wrong way.
Well, I know Phil was saying he wanted to have smaller, more experimental games too, so it doesn't necessarily have to be a time table for a AAA game...