Project Scarlet (next Xbox)

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JinCA

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Well, I know Phil was saying he wanted to have smaller, more experimental games too, so it doesn't necessarily have to be a time table for a AAA game...
Oh great more AA or less games, that's just what we need after State of Decay 2 and SoT lol :)
 

karmakid

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Didn’t it take them two years to develop their last game, with a team of 20?
 

Rollins

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Well, I know Phil was saying he wanted to have smaller, more experimental games too, so it doesn't necessarily have to be a time table for a AAA game...
True, and these aren’t totally new studios, so I’m hoping with experience and far more resources comes a faster turnaround time.
 

The Sunset Limited

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Microsoft is saying and doing all the right things to get me back on board at this point. 2019 is going to be a blast.
 

Rollins

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The written part of @karmakid’s vid:

Xbox Scarlett Will Use Zen 2 and AMD Next-Gen GPU Technology; 4K@60 FPS Is “On The Agenda”



The next console generation is fast approaching, with both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One consoles being now over five years old, but official details are still scarce on the new consoles that Sony and Microsoft will release in the fairly near future. According to rumors, however, the Xbox Scarlett, as the next-gen Microsoft console seems to be codenamed, is going to bring some very important changes in the console space.

According to a video report from renown Microsoft insider Brad Sams (Executive Editor of Thurrott.com), the Xbox Scarlett console, which will release in 2020, will be using Zen 2 and AMD’s next-generation GPU technology. The aim would be to have games running at 4K resolution and 60 frames per second. This would align with earlier rumors on the PlayStation 5 hardware, which pointed to an eight-core Zen CPU and a Navi-based GPU. Once again, both next-gen consoles by Sony and Microsoft could be powered by AMD technology.

For the next generation, Microsoft is going to take a varied approach, releasing different types of hardware that will be able to run games through the cloud, like a cheap Xbox console that runs game via the Azure infrastructure, as well as traditional hardware. The company is going to be embracing digital distribution even further, bringing changes to the Windows Store (as promised by Phil Spencer, Executive Vice President of Gaming at Microsoft) and Xbox App and creating a unified system.

Backward compatibility is also in the cards, which is not surprising considering how well it’s doing on Xbox One.





All of this information has not been confirmed officially, so we have to take it with a grain of salt for the time being. If the console is indeed coming in 2020, we will finally hear more about it sometime next year, possibly at E3 2019; after all, Microsoft already announced the Xbox One X console a year and a half before it actually shipped.



https://wccftech.com/xbox-scarlett-4...medium=twitter
 

pravus

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Holy s*** @ the serialized discs thing, that is pretty cool. I guess it makes sense since there were probably already discs pressed and being shipped when they reversed the Online-Only DRM stance. I'm actually surprised they waited this long to do this if that has still been a thing the entire time.
 

Nervusbreakdown

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Holy s*** @ the serialized discs thing, that is pretty cool. I guess it makes sense since there were probably already discs pressed and being shipped when they reversed the Online-Only DRM stance. I'm actually surprised they waited this long to do this if that has still been a thing the entire time.
That original policy would be far greater with the game share compare what we have now if that went through. People will always act like cavemen no matter what.
 

Rollins

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That original policy would be far greater with the game share compare what we have now if that went through. People will always act like cavemen no matter what.
I agree, but I think it was just the ‘message’ that was the problem.

Most people misunderstood and that was one of the major negative talking points at release.
 

Rollins

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Xbox Scarlett: Everything we know about Microsoft's next gaming console

Xbox Scarlett looks to be Microsoft's ambitious gaming console – here's what we know.



While the Xbox One X takes the crown as the most powerful video game console on the market, Microsoft is looking forward to what comes next. An upcoming Xbox device codenamed "Scarlett" looks to be the next major iteration of the console, with interesting details already beginning to surface.

Xbox Scarlett hardware will 'set the benchmark'



Back in 2017, we reported on an unannounced Xbox product in development, bearing the codename "Scarlett." While we'd heard mention of hardware in the works from various sources, we knew little about what the project entailed. Fast forward to E3 2018, Xbox head, Phil Spencer wrapped up its annual press conference with a teaser for what lies ahead. Reiterating the company's commitment to industry-leading hardware, Spencer confirmed its hardware team is "deep into architecting the next Xbox consoles." Boasting its "commitment to set the benchmark for console gaming," this lays the foundations for the rumored Scarlett project.

Rather than a single console, several reports indicate Xbox Scarlett is a family of devices broken into several tiers. It's unclear what scope of variety we should expect from the Scarlett family, though these will likely be tailored to separate gaming audiences. While a high-end console would draw enthusiasts, a low-cost unit similar to the canceled "Project Hobart" could pair with its upcoming game streaming service.

After shifting from PowerPC architecture to AMD x86-based processors, we expect Microsoft to stick with similar hardware for its next console. AMD CEO, Dr. Lisa Su, has previously discussed ongoing efforts to help deliver Microsoft's next Xbox "secret sauce," indicating its partnership is still underway.

As seen in past Xbox consoles, we also expect a new AMD graphics processing unit (GPU) to be used. The Xbox team is also sourcing an electrical engineer specialized in GDDR6 according to a career listing, indicating it plans to use this faster, more efficient graphics memory going forward. This signals a substantial GPU upgrade is on the way, with an accompanying central processing unit (CPU) boost assumed too. Further backed by a report from Brad Sams, AMD's Zen 2 CPU architecture and next-generation GPU technology are likely candidates.

Xbox Scarlett features: Forward compatibility, improved graphics, game streaming



Microsoft has previously suggested an end to console generations, instead focusing its resources on Xbox One revisions going forward. The Xbox One X was an exemplary execution of this concept, delivering a significant mid-generation hardware upgrade while maintaining compatibility with the existing library. Like the incremental smartphone model, such an approach allows Microsoft to introduce new hardware to a single platform.

Leveraging the same universal Windows 10 kernel, Xbox Scarlett should further build on the foundations of Xbox One. While this console generation first saw countless features missing from the Xbox 360, we expect Xbox Scarlett to maintain harmony with previous games, apps, and features.

If hardware upgrades are on the way, we can also assume enhanced graphical capabilities too. While the Xbox One was marketed as a "true 4K" console, many games still fail to deliver in tandem with a high frame rate. With 4K steadily becoming a standard in gaming, we expect Xbox Scarlett games to hit this resolution at 60 frames per second (FPS) without comprising other graphical features. Although 8K (7,680 pixels x 4,320 pixels) at 60 Hz is achievable under the revised HDMI 2.1 standard, it'll be some time before it's commonplace.

Other newly-added future-facing features like 120Hz support, variable refresh rates (VRR), and auto low latency mode (ALLM) could have a greater presence on Xbox Scarlett too.



Microsoft's commitment to deliver "console-quality games streaming" also likely ties into the Xbox Scarlett vision, via its newly-unveiled technology, Project xCloud. Packing custom Xbox consoles stripped-down into server blades, the firm is building a dedicated backbone for remote cloud gaming across the globe. Following the success of its subscription-based Xbox Game Pass, this will further expand the availability of full-fledged experiences to PCs, tablets, and phones. Spencer previously indicated a launch by 2020 and Xbox Scarlett could complement this.

So what about that long-promised virtual reality? Ahead of the Xbox One X launch, Microsoft discussed plans to bring VR to the console. While VR was the hot industry trend at that time, talk of the technology on Xbox has since dwindled. Speaking to GamesIndustry.biz, chief marketing officer, Mike Nichols stated the team doesn't have "any plans specific to Xbox consoles in virtual reality or mixed reality." At least for now, Xbox VR isn't looking likely.

Xbox Scarlett games and apps



With only a brief mention of new consoles from Microsoft, it's unclear which titles are targeting the system. Many upcoming Xbox One games will likely be playable on the consoles regardless of formal support, as a result of forward compatibility. Among these should be Halo Infinite, Gears 5, and upcoming Forza games – all which could get upgrades too.

Microsoft added five new game development studios to its portfolio in June, with two more just months later, doubling down on its commitment to top-tier first-party games. Among these is "The Initiative," a new studio based in Santa Monica, alongside Playground Games, Undead Labs, Compulsion Games, and Ninja Theory. Projects like Playground Games' rumored Fable title and other creations of these studios will likely make an arrival on Xbox Scarlett. Third-party developers are also investing in the future, with Bethesda already claiming that Starfield and The Elder Scrolls VI are targeting next-generation systems.

Xbox Scarlett release date and pricing



Microsoft is yet to confirm a launch window for the next Xbox consoles, though multiple reports indicate the team is targeting 2020. This would position the revisions three years after the launch of Xbox One X, and shortly ahead of Sony's PlayStation 5 scheduled for 2021. If true, there may be talk of Xbox Scarlett at E3 2019.

As always, plans can change, so take the rumored roadmap lightly. There's also currently no indication of price, but we could see different price points between different devices under the family. Your thoughts on Xbox Scarlett


As always, we'll continue to update this article with new information as it becomes available. What are you most looking forward to from Xbox Scarlett? Let us know in the comments.

Updated December 12, 2018: We've refreshed this article with the latest details on Scarlett.




https://www.windowscentral.com/xbox-scarlett
 

Rollins

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https://www.windowscentral.com/what...test-rumors?amp#click=https://t.co/5myBqDnZL0

What are Xbox 'Anaconda' and 'Lockhart'? Here are the latest next-gen Xbox rumors we're working with.
Jez Corden16 Dec 2018

Microsoft is building up to take next-gen head-on with its Xbox platform, which has notoriously been on the back foot against PlayStation throughout the current generation. Microsoft has been on a studio shopping spree as of late, vastly expanding its portfolio of exclusive content it hopes will entice gamers onto the Xbox ecosystem. Microsoft is also exploring lowering the barrier to entry by spreading across to mobile devices, via Project xCloud game streaming, as well as offering Netflix-like all-you-can-eat gaming via Xbox Game Pass. What do their current hardware plans look like, though?
Here's a round-up of the latest rumors we've been working with at the moment. As always, take it with a pinch of salt as plans can and do change, but one thing's for sure, Microsoft is going to hit next-gen with a fighting attitude.

Discless Xbox One SKU for 2019


As first reported by Thurrott, Microsoft is building a disc-less Xbox One console set to launch by spring 2019 if all things go to plan. We've also heard that Microsoft will look to announce the console as early as January 2019, alongside a disc-to-digital program that will allow you to convert your physical library into digital licenses via participating retailers.
If you were concerned about whether or not this indicates a new trend for Microsoft, fear not, we've heard from multiple sources that the "Scarlett" family next-gen consoles will still have disc drives, at least as an option. The success of the disc-less SKU will no doubt determine whether or not Microsoft moves ahead with providing a separate, cheaper disc-less SKU for the Scarlett next-gen devices. We'll have to wait and see.
Xbox "Anaconda," Xbox "Lockhart"
According to our sources, there are two consoles currently being prepped, aiming for a 2020 holiday debut — a cheaper "S"-style console, to succeed the Xbox One S, and a more beastly "X"-style console, to succeed the Xbox One X. The codename for the "S 2" seems to be "Lockhart," and the codename for the "X 2" seems to be "Anaconda," which may also be serving as a dev kit.
The next-gen Lockhart console will be the affordable SKU, providing the next-gen Xbox experience in a package potentially around as powerful as the current Xbox One X hardware wise, with refinements under the hood. The Anaconda console will be more powerful and more expensive, providing a cutting-edge console gaming experience. We've also heard Microsoft is exploring technology to dramatically reduce loading times, potentially including SSD storage in the package.
Game Core
We've been reporting on Microsoft's efforts surrounding Windows Core OS for a while now, and it does appear that there's a gaming angle to the puzzle. We've heard from multiple places that the next-gen Xbox consoles will be fully compatible with everything on your current Xbox One consoles, including your OG Xbox and Xbox 360 library via backward compatibility. We've also heard that Microsoft is working on a new platform for games dubbed "Game Core," as part of Windows Core OS, which the Scarlett family will support when it's ready. It extends the work Redmond has been doing on UWP.
Game Core should make it easier for developers to build games that function not only on Xbox "Scarlett" consoles but also Windows 10 PCs, further reducing the amount of work studios need to do to get games running across both platforms. Details are scant, but we'll hopefully hear more about Game Core either at GDC in early 2019, or a bit later at Microsoft's Build conference.
Handheld angle

Project xCloud is designed to allow you to play your Xbox console games on anydevice using input methods of your choice, whether it's a connected Xbox Bluetooth controller on an Android phone or via touch. That said, playing shooters via touch just feels clunky and awkward most of the time, and most phone controller mounts are tacky and cheap because there simply hasn't been much of a demand for them. Microsoft seems to be aware.
We've heard that Microsoft has been working with accessory vendors like Razer and others to ensure that Xbox gaming on mobile is as streamlined an experience as possible, with a range of new accessories, and maybe even devices, that will take advantage of the mobile possibilities that Project xCloud will bring.
2019 will be fun
The "Scarlett" project will be the first full generation fully overseen by EVP Phil Spencer with games as its own executive branch of Microsoft's overall strategy. The investment and innovation coming out of Xbox for its next-gen offering should vastly outstrip previous years, as Microsoft looks to make up lost ground.
Other large tech companies including Google and Amazon are still exploring the potential of the market, while giants like Tencent continue to make large investments in all sorts of gaming-oriented companies, including Epic Games and Discord. And of course, Nintendo and Sony continue to be utterly dominant in the space.
Microsoft may be fighting the console war on more fronts than usual in a few years, but thankfully, it is well-placed to do so. Either way, 2019 should prove to be an incredibly fun year for Microsoft gaming announcements.
 

The Sunset Limited

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I'm not sure if I love hearing about the lower end SKU. Forcing developers to make games for a less powerful console doesn't seem ideal from our perspective. Hopefully this isn't the case.
 
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karmakid

the illusive one ^^,
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Just hopping neither of the are “arcade” versions where there’s no hard drive, I’m ok if there’s no disc tray, but here’s hoping they compensate that with a larger hdd
 

JinCA

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Just hopping neither of the are “arcade” versions where there’s no hard drive, I’m ok if there’s no disc tray, but here’s hoping they compensate that with a larger hdd
That would make sense but a bigger HDD likely cost more to include than a disc drive.
 

Hedon

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https://www.windowscentral.com/what...test-rumors?amp#click=https://t.co/5myBqDnZL0

What are Xbox 'Anaconda' and 'Lockhart'? Here are the latest next-gen Xbox rumors we're working with.
Jez Corden16 Dec 2018

Microsoft is building up to take next-gen head-on with its Xbox platform, which has notoriously been on the back foot against PlayStation throughout the current generation. Microsoft has been on a studio shopping spree as of late, vastly expanding its portfolio of exclusive content it hopes will entice gamers onto the Xbox ecosystem. Microsoft is also exploring lowering the barrier to entry by spreading across to mobile devices, via Project xCloud game streaming, as well as offering Netflix-like all-you-can-eat gaming via Xbox Game Pass. What do their current hardware plans look like, though?
Here's a round-up of the latest rumors we've been working with at the moment. As always, take it with a pinch of salt as plans can and do change, but one thing's for sure, Microsoft is going to hit next-gen with a fighting attitude.

Discless Xbox One SKU for 2019


As first reported by Thurrott, Microsoft is building a disc-less Xbox One console set to launch by spring 2019 if all things go to plan. We've also heard that Microsoft will look to announce the console as early as January 2019, alongside a disc-to-digital program that will allow you to convert your physical library into digital licenses via participating retailers.
If you were concerned about whether or not this indicates a new trend for Microsoft, fear not, we've heard from multiple sources that the "Scarlett" family next-gen consoles will still have disc drives, at least as an option. The success of the disc-less SKU will no doubt determine whether or not Microsoft moves ahead with providing a separate, cheaper disc-less SKU for the Scarlett next-gen devices. We'll have to wait and see.
Xbox "Anaconda," Xbox "Lockhart"
According to our sources, there are two consoles currently being prepped, aiming for a 2020 holiday debut — a cheaper "S"-style console, to succeed the Xbox One S, and a more beastly "X"-style console, to succeed the Xbox One X. The codename for the "S 2" seems to be "Lockhart," and the codename for the "X 2" seems to be "Anaconda," which may also be serving as a dev kit.
The next-gen Lockhart console will be the affordable SKU, providing the next-gen Xbox experience in a package potentially around as powerful as the current Xbox One X hardware wise, with refinements under the hood. The Anaconda console will be more powerful and more expensive, providing a cutting-edge console gaming experience. We've also heard Microsoft is exploring technology to dramatically reduce loading times, potentially including SSD storage in the package.
Game Core
We've been reporting on Microsoft's efforts surrounding Windows Core OS for a while now, and it does appear that there's a gaming angle to the puzzle. We've heard from multiple places that the next-gen Xbox consoles will be fully compatible with everything on your current Xbox One consoles, including your OG Xbox and Xbox 360 library via backward compatibility. We've also heard that Microsoft is working on a new platform for games dubbed "Game Core," as part of Windows Core OS, which the Scarlett family will support when it's ready. It extends the work Redmond has been doing on UWP.
Game Core should make it easier for developers to build games that function not only on Xbox "Scarlett" consoles but also Windows 10 PCs, further reducing the amount of work studios need to do to get games running across both platforms. Details are scant, but we'll hopefully hear more about Game Core either at GDC in early 2019, or a bit later at Microsoft's Build conference.
Handheld angle

Project xCloud is designed to allow you to play your Xbox console games on anydevice using input methods of your choice, whether it's a connected Xbox Bluetooth controller on an Android phone or via touch. That said, playing shooters via touch just feels clunky and awkward most of the time, and most phone controller mounts are tacky and cheap because there simply hasn't been much of a demand for them. Microsoft seems to be aware.
We've heard that Microsoft has been working with accessory vendors like Razer and others to ensure that Xbox gaming on mobile is as streamlined an experience as possible, with a range of new accessories, and maybe even devices, that will take advantage of the mobile possibilities that Project xCloud will bring.
2019 will be fun
The "Scarlett" project will be the first full generation fully overseen by EVP Phil Spencer with games as its own executive branch of Microsoft's overall strategy. The investment and innovation coming out of Xbox for its next-gen offering should vastly outstrip previous years, as Microsoft looks to make up lost ground.
Other large tech companies including Google and Amazon are still exploring the potential of the market, while giants like Tencent continue to make large investments in all sorts of gaming-oriented companies, including Epic Games and Discord. And of course, Nintendo and Sony continue to be utterly dominant in the space.
Microsoft may be fighting the console war on more fronts than usual in a few years, but thankfully, it is well-placed to do so. Either way, 2019 should prove to be an incredibly fun year for Microsoft gaming announcements.
What happens with compatibility if MS releases Windows 11? Can they put that on all the Xbox consoles to replace their Windows 10 OS?
 

Rollins

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Deciphering Xbox Scarlett: Anaconda, Anthem, Danta, Lockhart, Maverick, and Roma





It’s no secret that Microsoft is working on its next-generation console for an expected release in 2020. The hardware is actively being developed but the launch strategy is starting to materialize and this post will help you make sense of all the different codenames that are being talked about.

The name Xbox Scarlett has been floating around since this summer and it represents, at a broad level, the next generation of consoles. As of right now, there are two being planned, Anaconda (which others have noted as well) and Lockhart, which is an ‘arcade’ version of Anaconda.

Microsoft refers to Anaconda as Scarlett Pro and Lockhart as Scarlett Arcade. Think of Lockhart as the successor to the Xbox One S, whereas Anaconda is the successor to the Xbox One X. And to toss one more name into the bunch, Danta is the name of the Scarlett devkit that is based on Anaconda.

On the xCloud side of things, there is Anthem; this is what Microsoft calls the Xbox One S version of its cloud platform. Anthem V2 will roll out later this year which will be based on a revised version of the Xbox One S that is focused on reducing the cost to manufacture the hardware. And of course, there is an Anaconda Cloud in the works as well.

For the hardware components, to little surprise, AMD will be building the chips for the next-gen console. I’m hearing that it may be based on AMD Zen 2 and will also use next-gen GPU architecture as well. As for the specific performance targets, that’s still a bit murky at this time.

On the software side of things, Microsoft is working on what it calls GameCore that will benefit both PC and Xbox gamers. The goal of this feature is to make it easier for developers to build games faster and have more built-in functionality out of the dev kit box.

GameCore is the evolution of the UWP platform and is going to help Microsoft eventually start building container-based apps. GameCore will make it significantly easier for developers to utilize Xbox services on both PC and the Xbox and should provide for higher levels of performance with lower-level system access and control of hardware assets.

But before those devices and software show up, we will first see Maverick. This is the disk-less console that I wrote about a few weeks back that is still on track to be released next year. I believe it will still be released in the spring but as with all hardware and products, plans may change or be canceled.

Along with Maverick, Microsoft is planning Roma, which is a ‘digital attach’ feature for the Xbox. What this will allow you to do, as long is it is shipped as planned, is order an Xbox One with digital services ‘attached’ to the hardware when it ships to your house.

Think of it this way, in the near future, you will be able to buy an Xbox, subscribe to GamePass and Xbox Live, pre-pay for a fixed time period, and when your device shows up, it will be pre-configured from day one. While this may not be a killer feature, the streamlined process will make the day one experience a little bit better.

And I also think Microsoft may be trolling me as well. There is a codename for a series of Xbox One controllers called Cincinnati, that was part of the announcement last year where you can put an NFL logo on an Xbox controller. If you aren’t familiar with the Cincinnati Bengals, they continue to be a thorn in my side for the past two decades with, at best, losing in the first round of the playoffs.

There’s a lot we don’t know yet about the next-gen consoles including the hardware specs, although AMD is building the chips and GPU, and the benchmarks the company is targeting for raw performance. But I think it’s safe to say, considering the Xbox One X already enables 4k gaming, anything less than stable 4k, 60FPS, for Anaconda, will be a letdown.




https://www.thurrott.com/xbox/195395...rick-and-roma#
 

Rollins

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karmakid

the illusive one ^^,
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Stream box, portable stream box/tablet, surface studio pro x-stream box, and your all in one regular video game system with the power of two kenworths loaded with titan x graphic cards
 

Hedon

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Ugh I don’t have room for 4 more consoles under my TV.
 

Rollins

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PS5 And Next Xbox Will Likely Have 8 to 12GB of RAM, Says Hellpoint Dev

But an additional 8GB of VRAM, which means total memory available will be 16-20GB.



With rumors of next generation consoles beginning to heat up, questions abound about what exactly we may expect from the next Xbox and PlayStation consoles. Microsoft and Sony both try to achieve major hardware jumps with each new iteration of their consoles. So what do the PS5 and Xbox Scarlett have in store for us? Ryzen CPUs? 16GB of RAM?

On the latter front, Marc-André Jutras, technical director at Cradle Games, developers of the upcoming Hellpoint, and a veteran of the AAA game industry for over 15 years, thinks we’re not going to see a jump that big. Speaking exclusively to GamingBolt, he said that the next consoles will have RAM ranging from 8-12GB—since 16GB of RAM is far beyond the scope of what any game currently uses.

“I don’t think we will see 16GB of RAM, most games don’t use that much RAM anyway,” he said. “I think the next generation will be between 8 and 12, probably. What you will see however is probably a good amount of cores. I wouldn’t be surprised if the next gen was Ryzen 2600 or something like that. Because it is really stable, cheap, and has a good amount of cores.”

However, he did add that the consoles will have a large amount of dedicated VRAM, rather than a unified memory pool—which will help them achieve 4K graphics, and bring the total memory pool available to developers far beyond the current 8GB offered by the PS4 and Xbox One anyway.

“One thing that is going to change will be, you will get a lot more focus on the VRAM, which is the big bottleneck right now if you want good 4K games, because 4K frame buffer takes a lot of space,” he said. “So if you end up with a 4K buffer, you need four times the VRAM. So I think you will see, you won’t see shared RAM space next gen like you do with the PS4. I don’t think you will see that because it’s a big bottleneck. You’ll see more VRAM to support 4K and 5K and whatever else comes around. Just how much of that? I wouldn’t be surprised if the PS5 had 8GB of RAM and 8GB of VRAM.”

I can see this happening—while I don’t know much about what specific numbers the next consoles will have, a split between RAM and VRAM going forward seems to make a lot of sense. VRAM can be used for quicker calculations and to achieve higher resolution graphics, and can also help ensure that the portion of memory cordoned off for the console’s OS doesn’t impact graphical performance.



https://gamingbolt.com/ps5-and-next-...-hellpoint-dev
 

Frozpot

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Given the One X already uses 12, that's an easy prediction...